Category Archives: something new about something old

The birth, the life, and the death of a star

I’m not sure which I find more astonishing – that we can actually describe the life of our sun, both past and to come, or the fact that anybody in the world who has access to the internet can watch … Continue reading

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Gift on deposit

In the middle of the 17th century, the people of Cheshire, southeast of Liverpool in northern England, were envious of neighbouring towns that were getting rich mining the coal that lay beneath their feet.  So they began to dig too.  But they … Continue reading

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2008 was longer than usual. Really

Welcoming in the new year for 2009 was just a little more complicated than usual.  And actually, the “usual” is already a good deal more complicated than most of us realize as we toast the new year at the stroke … Continue reading

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Not only strange…

The Hubble Telescope has been sending us photographs from almost as far away as it is possible to go.  Space and what’s out there is not only “deeply strange,” but also almost “impossibly beautiful.” If you haven’t seen them already, … Continue reading

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Rock of the ages

The oldest rocks anywhere in the world may have been found on the shore of Hudson Bay in Canada.  They have been dated to be 4.28 billion years old, and must have been among the very first rocks formed on … Continue reading

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No we can’t! The celebration of Pi

Pi is the circumference of a circle divided by its diameter.  Roughly speaking, that’s always about 3.14.  In American-speak, that’s today.  So today (I’m writing this on March 14th) is Pi day. What I like about pi is that it … Continue reading

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Dynamic dust

It seems like another one of those amazing things scientists seem to discover as they tramp about the universe.  An international group of sciencists from Russia, Germany, and Australia have found that galactic dust can form into helixes and double helixes … Continue reading

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